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Rush University Presidential Inauguration – Installation

Rush University Presidential Inauguration – Installation


Presidential In Inauguration Presidential Inauguration (Organ Music) Ladies and Gentlemens and Ladies and Gentlemen, Our
Program Ladies and gentlemen, our
program will begin in ten minutes. ANNOUNCER: Please take your
seats. Our program will begin in five
minutes. ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen,
please take your seats. Our program will begin in one
minute.>>Announcer:
ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, please take your seats. Our program will begin in one
minute. ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen,
please stand for the national anthem. ♫ O say can you see by the dawn’s early light ♫ ♫ What so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming
♫ ♫ Whose broad stripes and bright
stars through the perilous fight♫ ♫ O’er the ramparts we watched,
were so gallantly streaming ♫ ♫ And the rockets’ red glare, the bombs bursting in air Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there
O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave Good afternoon, ladies and
gentlemen. Thank you, choir, for a
beautiful rendition. My name is Susan Crown, chairman
of the Rush University System for Health. For the Board of Trustees,
guestst,s, faculty members, students, staff, members and, friends of Rush,
welcome to this very special occasion marking the installation of Rush
University’s fourth President. With a history spanning more
than 180 years, Rush has been part of Chicago longer than any
other healthcare institution in the city. It all began in 1837 with Rush Medical College, established as
the first medical school in the city and one of the earliest.
Today, in the tradition of outstanding healthcare
education, research, and quality service, .
The University has been empowered by the passion and
dedication of faculty, students, researchers,
residents, and fellows. And as we gather today to
install the university’s fourth President, that power, enthusiasm, and
excellence continues to inspire and propel
us forward. As Emerson said, our chief — is
someone who will inspire us to be what
we know we could be. Leaders have — force behind
Rush University. And each in their own way will
inspire us to be what we know we could
be. Rush University’s first
President — robust and complete health sciences university. He added two colleges during his
tenure. Rush University’s second
President helped establish research and
excellence. And Dr. Larry Goodman, the third
President of Rush University, expertly brought it all
together, growing the University, fully transforming
the Rush campus, and securing a place as one of the
highest- highest-quality academic health systems in the
world. Dr. Gabriel, on behalf of the Rush
Board of Trustees, I am delighted to be the first to officially welcome you to
this Presidency and wish you well as you set off to carry the traditions of
those who came before you. I can’t wait to see what you
will inspire us to be in the new
world. It is now my pleasure to
introduce and welcome keynote speaker Dr. Helene Gayle, President and CEO
of the Chicago Community Trust, a foundation dedicated to
improving our region through strategic grant-making, civic engagement, and inspiring
philanthropy. Before assuming a leadership
position at the trust in October of 2017,
Dr. Gayle was CEO of a social
initiative now known as Mackenzie Org, a
nonprofit with partnerships for social impact. For almost a decade, and where I
got to know her best, Dr. Gayle served as President and
CEO of CARE, a leading international humanitarian
organization. She’s an expert at health issues and spent 20 years
for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention working primarily in
HIV/AIDS. She also worked at the Gates
Foundation on AIDS and other global health issues.
This is a woman who likes to go to school. She got a degree in psychology,
an NID, and an MPH. She has received 18 — yes, 18
honorary degrees — and holds faculty appointments at the
University of Washington and another university. Her extremely impressive career
is inspiring and serves as an outstanding example of a person
actively making a different in this community and in our world. It’s my distinct honor and
pleasure to introduce our keynote speaker, Dr. Helene Gayle. [ applause ] DR. GAYLE: Thank you for that
introduction and for inviting me to speak this afternoon.
Also, I want to thank you for your many years of friendship and support
during our days together. We really did have a lot of good
times. I want to acknowledge the
leadership of Dr. Larry Goodman. What an incredible legacy you
leave behind. During your tenure, you oversaw the $1
billion renovation of the Rush campus, the formation of the
expanded Rush System, a financial turnaround, and
national recognition for excellence in patient care,
research, community engagement, and technological innovation. And Rush University enrollment
more than doubled, and the University expanded its academic
programs. [ applause ]>>So I think it is clear why it
is time to have one person who can focus on the University and
medical and health education. As someone who has had the
privilege of leading organizations, I think one of
the most rewarding aspects is knowing that someone is coming
after you who can take the organization further
than you did, and in new directions you never knew were
possible. In that, I think Rush has found
such a leader. I was fortunate to have a chance
to meet and talk to Dr. Sherine Gabriel – hear her life story,
her professional journey, and her aspirations for Rush
University. As a clinician, a researcher,
educator, and seasoned administer, she is bringing so
much to this new role. I was excited to hear her vision
of the many ways she wants to continue to build excellence and
innovation across the medical, nursing, health
sciences, and graduate colleges, and continued
to integrate the University with the rest of the Rush system.
Equally, I was excited to hear about her commitment to health
equity and the work that Rush has pioneered in applying the
social determinants of health, perhaps most notably in the landmark Westside United program
started under Dr. Goodman’s leadership. I believe Rush has
the opportunity to be the premier institution in assuring
that its students are not only of the highest academic caliber as
measured by biomedical science and clinical care, but also in
understanding and applying an equity lens to
its work. I applaud Dr. Gabriel’s vision that this is
the institution that will be known for training healthcare
professionals who recognize that a person’s health is about more than what happens
in the hospital. Health is what happens throughout our lives. We
know that care alone is not sufficient to ensure better
health outcomes. Only 10 to 20 percent of health
outcomes are attributable to health care. The other 80 to 90 percent are
caused by social determinants of health — health-related
behaviors, socioeconomic factors, and environmental
factors. And of course, we know our genetic makeup can help or
hinder as well. I have said many times how
excited I was when coming to Chicago a couple of years ago to
learn about Westside United. As one of the largest anchor
institutions on the West Side, Rush embraced its responsibility
to invest not only in providing care but investing in the
community. Its anchor statement starts by
noting that “The root causes of many diseases and chronic conditions that
shorten the lives of West Side residents link back not to
genetics or poor choices, but to social, economic and
environmental factors. We want to address the
causes of poor health, not simply treat the symptoms of
disease. ” Why is it so important for
Rush to be a leader in pioneering approaches to health equity and addressing the
social determinants of health? At least in part, it is because
we have such a formidable challenge. Chicago has the largest life
expectancy gap in the nation. If you live in a neighborhood
like Englewood on the South Side, the average life
expectancy is 60 years. In Lawndale on the West Side,
it’s 63 years. If you live roughly nine miles
away in Streeterville, it rises dramatically to 90 years – 10
years higher than the U.S. average. Those few miles mean
you’re nine times more likely to be killed by a gun, four times
more likely to die from diabetes, six times more likely
to be unemployed. In Chicago and so much of the
nation, your health nation, your health outcomes —
when and how you will live and die – are determined much more
by your zip code than your genetic code. I spent much of my
career working in impoverished nations around the world that have better health outcomes than our
residents on the South and West sides of Chicago. This is tragic
and unacceptable. But sadly, it’s not new. In
1966, Dr. Martin Luther King came to Chicago to speak at the
second convention of the Medical Committee for Human Rights. At a press conference before his
speech, he said, “Of all the forms of inequality, injustice
in health is the most shocking and the most inhuman because it
often results in physical death. ” I have heard this cited many
times and often misquoted as “of all the
forms of inequality health care is the most shocking and
inhumane.” Now, I am not sure if Dr, King himself really
understood that distinction between health and health care,
but it is interesting and instructive that this is how his
words have been interpreted. But we do know that Dr. King dedicated his life to
alleviating poverty, eradicating racism, and promoting quality education and safe housing —
what we now recognize as the social determinants of health. I
think he understood then, as we do now, that we need to look
beyond health care alone. Now don’t get me wrong. I am still a
doctor, and I am thrilled by the pace of innovation and new technology that is changing how
we treat diseases that used to be death
sentences. We have made chronic diseases like HIV and many
cancers manageable illnesses. But I am still plagued by the
fact that our hospitals and clinics are filled with people
who shouldn’t have to be there to begin with. And this is why the commitment
and investments Rush continues to make not just inside the
walls of its hospitals or , but in the community in which
it sits are so important. This institution understands that it
is not an island and that in order to support and strengthen
the lives of the patients it sees – it must invest in the
neighborhood. Westside United is an incredible example. You probably know Rush, Sinai,
University of Illinois and Cook County Health Systems, and Amita
Health are working in partnership with
communities on the West Side. Collectively, they have all
committed to reducing that life expectancy gap between the West
Side and communities like Streeterville and the Loop. To do this, Rush and its
partners are stepping beyond their traditional roles of
providing quality health services to working in
partnership with communities to tackle the root causes of poor
health like unemployment, lack of access to quality education
and healthy foods, and unsafe neighborhoods. The arc Rush has taken -– from providing the highest quality of
health care and serving the health care needs of a broad
range of communities, to taking on bolder initiatives to address the drivers for poor
health and health disparity -– illustrates
an evolution that will improve the lives of individual patients
and transform communities. I began my own career as a
pediatrician. But I soon realized much of what I had to
offer was not addressing the root causes of why the children
I saw presented with illness. I was treating consequences, not
causes. So I have spent my life expanding beyond what we do with
our medical tool kit to think about the other 80 to 90 percent of things that affect
our health: our income and assets,
our neighborhoods, our food, our safety, our status in life, and
our sense of belonging. Thankfully there are still
people who are happy not following my non-traditional
career path because we still need great doctors and nurses
and health professionals. That is why Rush University is so
important. But should their time be spent on caring for people
who are there because our other systems have failed
them? We know that when communities are socially and
economically healthy, they have healthier populations. It’s all interconnected: as employment and income rises,
obesity and heart disease falls. So does alcohol and drug abuse,
suicide, depression, and violent crime. That is why I am so proud
to be with all of you today to celebrate this pivotal moment in
Rush’s history or perhaps better said -– herstory. Rush has given so much to this city, to our nation, and to our
world. Because of the incredible foundation and legacy of Dr.
Goodman and the impressive track record and visionary leadership
of Dr. Gabriel, I know Rush University will continue to be a
pioneer of excellence in medical and allied health education with
the understanding that health starts with healthy communities. I couldn’t be more excited to
watch this next chapter of Rush unfold. Thank you again for inviting me
to speak to you today. Thank you, Susan. Kudos to you, Larry.
Congratulations, Sherine. And congratulations to the entire
Rush community. Your bold vision is a beacon
that will continue to guide the West Side, Chicago and the broader Chicago region,
and our nation on a course toward health, vitality, and
prosperity. Thank you. (Applause) Those were inspirational words. I appreciate your willingness to
contribute your perspective to this occasion.
Your passion for improving the lives of others is admirable,
directly aligned with Rush’s mission of improving health and
equality in our world. It’s an absolute pleasure to
introduce Dr. Deutsch, who has served as
Provost for more than 15 years, 12 of which were concurrent with his work as Dean
of Rush Medical College. Under his leadership, there was tremendous success, in both
research and education, and with the student
body itself. I’d like to welcome Dr. Thomas Deutsch, James A. Hunter Professor of Rush
University, to the podium. (Applause)
DR. DEUTSCH: Thank you for that introduction, Susan.
And thank you, Dr. Gayle, for those inspiring words.
As provost since the beginning of Dr. Gabriel’s term as
President, I’ve been honored to introduce her to the
Rush University community. From town halls with faculty and
staff to events with students, Dr. Gabriel has immersed herself
in learning about the people who
make Rush a great place to learn,
discover, and thrive. Dr. Gabriel embraced the role of
leading the remarkable individuals who make up this
community. And her passion for continuous
progress gives me great confidence that
her tenure as President will foster a culture of excellence,
professionalism, and service in Rush University.
For the next part of our program, to share our gratitude and to
welcome her as the fourth President of Rush University, several groups
representing the University community are here to present
Dr. Gabriel with symbolic gifts.
Representatives from each group — students, faculty, staff,
alumni, and previous Presidents — will bring our gifts to the stage and share the
meaning behind the subject. Finally, the Board of Governors
will present Dr. Gabriel with the Presidential
Medical, and the Chair of the Board of
Governors will formally introduce Dr. Gabriel as
President of Rush University. First, let’s welcome our
University Student Representatives to the stage. Address the mic first.
Okay. Good afternoon, everyone.
On behalf of the students of Rush University, welcome to our
Presidential Inauguration. My name is Ayaat Dahleh, from
the graduate college, Chair of
Student Senate. From Rush Medical College, the
College of Nursing, and Joseph from the
College of Health Sciences. In each college we have a
tradition of giving students — on their first year of school. (Laughter)
This year — more than just a rite of passage. But it introduces the student to
their first step in a professional
medical career. Expectations set. But it prepares you to embark on
a journey for the rest of your
life. And as students, we know that
life is all about — been with us for a
short period of time, she’s taught us
how to do that. Tradition — on behalf of the
students of Rush University, we are pleased to present you with a white coat
and a University pin. Our school’s future.
Thank you so much, Dr. Gabriel. (
[ applause ] (Applause) I’m — at Rush University. Join me — a professor —
sciences — and — Associate Professor in
Rush Medical College and Graduate College.
We are representing the excellent faculty at Rush
University. And on behalf of Rush University
faculty, we present to you, Dr. Gabriel, a plaque engraved with
with something. The concepts — patient care,
education, and research. And it’s in keeping with the —
delivery. And here at Rush, our faculty
practice what they teach, for the benefit of the student and
patient alike. And we hope you keep this in
sight of your workspace as inspiration of
Rush University’s commitment to this philosophy. (Applause) I’m the Chief of Staff.
And I’m one of the more fortunate staff members at Rush
University, part of this institution, from supplying
research and instructional design to assistance in
classrooms, advising students through financial, academic, and
personal challenges. Staff contributes to the success
of our students and the excellent reputation of our
University. Dr. Gabriel, on behalf of the staff
of Rush University, we present you with this framed photo of
the Rush University campus as a representation of the role our staff play in making this
campus a vibrant — live, discover, and
thrive. We welcome your contributions as
a leader of this campus. (Applause) Good afternoon, I’m Dr. Fred Brown, alumnus of the
college of nursing, joined by an alumni of
the College of Health Sciences, with the College of Medicine.
And also, Dr. Jenny Wallace from the graduate
college. We have fond memories of our
time here and the transitioning to professionals and experts
working in healthcare and science. What bonds us is our commitment
to the highest quality of patient care, which we learned
at Rush University. On behalf of the Rush alumni as
a symbol of our shared history we present to you with good
medicine a story of generations of dedicated health
professionals who shaped Rush to become one of the nation’s
leading academic health centers. We are excited to share and make
our own memories with you and hope you find inspiration and
guidance in this story as well. Thank you. (Applause) Good afternoon, everyone. I’m Larry Goodman, immediate
past President of Rush University.
It’s a huge pleasure for me to be here today.
The gift I have the key to the session hall of Rush University.
Truth in advertising, it’s not the actual key.
(Laughter.) DR. GOODMAN: But it does
represent something more symbolic.
The House is made possible by a gift of somebody who worked at
Rush in the past, who was an employee and an inventor, Robert
Sessions. And it is not only the home of
the President of Rush University, it represents the
home of the University, and not just the President.
It is an opportunity for you as the President to take advantage
of seeing people in a more social setting — that is our
students, our faculty, our staff, alumni, our board members
— and put your own stamp on the three most vital things about the
University — the University as a community of itself, the
culture of the University, and the University’s sense of
family. Now, often in inauguration, it
is sort of like what might be. But we all know that you’ve
already done that in the nine plus months you’ve lived at the Sessions home.
You’ve done a wonderful job of this.
On a more personal note, we’re thrilled to see you take over
this wonderful resource with Frank.
Congratulations. (Applause) Good afternoon.
On behalf of the Board of Governors of Rush University, we
thank you for joining us today. First, it’s my great honor to
introduce Carole Segal, Chairman of the Rush University Board of
Governors. And I am Bob Wislow, Vice
Chairman. Vice Chairman means that both
Carole and Dr. Gabriel are my bosses, so I’d
better not screw up today. Carole and I are honored to be a
part of this very special day for both Rush University and Dr.
Gabriel. As members of Presidential
Search Committee, our dream was to find
an extraordinary leader. We couldn’t imagine a more
perfect fit for that job than Dr. Gabriel.
It’s gratifying for us to have the honor of formally
introducing Dr. Gabriel to the Rush family and to present her with the first-ever
Rush Presidential Medal. As tradition dating back to the
Middle Ages, chains of office are solid
metal necklaces worn by university presidents on ceremonial occasions. The President’s medal is an
integral part of the regalia, symbolizing
authority, responsibility, and commitment to the University
community. This symbol is deeply embedded
in the history of many universities
world worldwide. In today’s inauguration, we
introduce this tradition for the first
time at Rush University. The medal is comprised of gold
links bearing the names of the ten user tenures of our three
past Rush University Presidents, and the chain is anchored by a
large medallion cast in gold and depicting the Rush
University seal. Carole, the medallion, please. (Laughing) (Applause) Well, I want to thank everybody
for being with us today. It’s a very, very special day
for Rush University. So much has gone into getting us
to this monumental day, and I am
grateful and appreciative to every single person who has
contributed and supported our efforts along this your Honor
journey. During this search that
ultimately brought us Dr. Gabriel, we scoured the entire
country for the right person to lead
this excellent University. We knew after several interviews
that Dr. Gabriel was the right person for the position of President of Rush
University. After getting to know her and
working closely together over the past few months of her tenure her at
Rush, I can say with absolute confidence that our instincts
were right. Rush University is extremely
lucky to have found this exceptional person to lead us
into the future. And I am pleased to be here
today to introduce her. Prior to joining Rush, Dr. Gabriel was the Dean of Rutgers,
Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and
CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Medical
Group, as well as a distinguished
professor of medicine. Dr. Gabriel completed her
residency, followed by a fellowship in rheumatology, at
Mayo Clinic and continued there as a physician, researcher,
educator, and leader for nearly 30 years, cumulating in
her appointment as Dean of Mayo
College Clinic of Medicine in 2012.
She completed her undergraduate education at the university of
Regina in Canada, and the College of Pharmacy at the
University of Saskatchewan Medical School before earning
her medical degree at the University of
Saskatchewan College of Medicine. She received her master’s degree
from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, and completed
additional study at the Wharton School at the
University of Pennsylvania and the Kellogg
School of Management at Northwestern University.
As you can see, she is supremely qualified for this position and
has already hit the ground running
as the fourth President of Rush University.
It is my honor and my pleasure to introduce you to Dr. Sherine Gabriel. (Applause) DR. GABRIEL: Wow.
Okay. Well, it is just wonderful to
see all of you here. I just couldn’t be happier to
have you with us today. As many of you know, Carole
Segal is a very special person. She is a successful entrepreneur
in the retail industry, and one of the most influential business
women in Chicago and beyond. She is a volunteer, and a
philanthropist. And, as a trustee of Rush University
Medical Center, and chair of the Board of Governors of the University,
her wise counsel has been invaluable. Especially during this time of
change. Carole, ever since I met you
during the interview process, I’ve been struck by your keen intellect, your poise,
your judgment, but especially by the compassionate, kind and
caring way you do everything you do. I have been truly privileged to
work with you and learn from you. Thank you, Carole, for your
leadership, and that very kind introduction. Thank you.
(Applause). >>DR. GABRIEL: I’d also like
to thank Bob Wislow for his role as vice chair of the Board of
Governors. He was just kidding. They’re both my bosses. Your
leadership and insights, Bob, will shape the university’s
future. I feel truly blessed to have both you and Carole as my
guides on this journey. And thank you, Susan, for your
exemplary dedication to all things Rush, and for opening
this historic event. Your long and deep commitment to
Rush helped make us what we are today. And now, with you at the helm of
the board of trustees, we look forward to an even brighter
future. (Applause) DR. GABRIEL: Dr. Helene Gayle –
you are an inspiration to all of us. Your career exemplifies how
a single, brilliant, committed, and fearless woman can make a
difference with overwhelming problems like global poverty and
HIV/AIDS. So “Take note all you students
out there.” And thank you, Helene. Yes, let’s do that.
(Applause) DR. GABRIEL: Tom Deutsch – you
did a wonderful job, as always, emceeing the presentation of the
gifts. But I have to say I am most
grateful for the gift of working with you these past few months. (Applause) R DR. GABRIEL: I’d
now like to recognize all other members of the platform party you see here
— our amazing Deans – Drs. Andrew Bean, Mark Foreman,
Charlotte Royeen, and Dino Rumoro. Our remarkable vice-provosts,
Gayle Ward, Drs. Susan Chubinskaya, Josh Jacobs, Rose,
and David Katz. Our brand-new provost, Dr. Susan Freeman. Our CEOs and my incredible
partners, Dr. Omar Lateef, CEO of Rush University Medical Center, and Dr. Ranga
Krishnan, CEO of the Rush University System for Health. And my very dear mentor, who
traveled here from Canada – Dr. Claire
Bombardier. We’ll clap for them all at once.
(Applause) PRESIDENT GABRIEL: A special
thank you to Dr. Larry Goodman, for leading the procession today
as marshal. Nothing could be more fitting. It was Larry’s visionary and
transformational leadership that has placed Rush on the
trajectory of success that we see today. Larry, we all owe you
a deep debt of gratitude. Thank you.
(Applause) PRESIDENT GABRIEL: On a personal
note, I am grateful for the incredible support I received
along the way, first and foremost, from my family. My husband, Frank, in the second
row there, could not possibly have been more supportive of me
throughout my entire career. Frank, your love and support is
the foundation of everything I do, and everything I am. Thank
you. (Applause)
PRESIDENT GABRIEL: I’m also immensely grateful to my parents, Huda and Ezzat, who are
still with me but can’t be here, who have put my interests above
theirs my entire life; from their decision to immigrate from Egypt to bring us a better
future in America to their decision to move from Canada to
Rochester, Minnesota, to help us raise our boys. And, to my two sons, Richard and Matthew, who I hope are
watching, who are a constant source of joy,
happiness and pride. Thank you for being just plain
wonderful, and for remaining near me, no matter how far away
you may be. (Applause)
PRESIDENT GABRIEL: I’d also like to recognize members of my
Mayo Clinic family who are here today with us waving Drs. Cindy
Crowson, Teri Rummans, Carl Reading, and Naveen Pereira. And
my dear friends, from Rutgers and New Jersey, Dr. Keith Lewis and Mr. Fernando
Oliveira. And my good friend from New
York, Dr. Peggy Crow. And I believe I also have a dear
friend from Rwanda today, Vice
Chancellor of Health Equity, thank you guys all for making this trip. (Applause)
DR. GABRIEL: And lastly, my thanks to all of my Rush colleagues who are
hear here today and streaming to celebrate
with us. A university is defined not by its physical structures,
but by its people. To me you are Rush University. Chairs and members of the Board
of Governors, Chair, and members of the Board of Trustees, faculty,
staff, alumni, friends, and family, I
am honored and humbled to stand before you today as the 4th
president of Rush University, and the first fully dedicated to
this great institution. I follow a tradition, as you’ve
heard a little bit already, of bold and
transformational leadership, which for the University, began
with its first president, Dr. James A. Campbell, who created a
true health sciences university with the founding of the College
of Health Sciences, and the Graduate College. Next, Dr. Leo M. Henikoff led a
great period of expansion, particularly in research, with the construction of the
Robert H. and Terri Cohn Research Building – still the
home for basic science research at Rush. And, of course, Larry Goodman,
who led Rush for 17 years. Under his leadership, student enrollment grew to more than
2,500. He built partnerships with Chicago high schools and
colleges. He championed Rush’s Anchor Mission, and our goals to
increase the life expectancy of our West Side neighbors, and
more. Under his guidance, Rush
University Medical Center grew into the Rush University System
for Health. We added Rush Copley Medical Center. We strengthened
the integration with Rush Oak Park Hospital. And, we added outpatient
locations across Chicago and the suburbs. At the main campus, Larry led
the construction of the absolutely stunning new hospital
tower, and early planning for the Joan and Paul Rubschlager
Building for cancer and neurosciences. And I’m grateful that Joan and
Paul are here with us today. Larry’s legacy at Rush and
across our community will continue to impact many lives
for many years to come. Thank you. (Applause) PRESIDENT GABRIEL: Today is a
celebration for Rush University. We are a nationally recognized
leader in health education, innovative research, and patient
care. Our education and research programs are consistently ranked
among the best anywhere. And Rush University Medical Center was just two weeks ago
ranked #1 for quality of care in the nation. (Applause)
DR. GABRIEL: Sorry, we even beat out
Mayo, so. (Laughing)
PRESIDENT GABRIEL: This remarkable success is occurring
against the backdrop of a failing health care system in
America. Where health care expenditures are twice as much
per capita than in much of the developed world. Yet health
outcomes are far worse. Where workforce shortages in the
health professions loom large even as the population ages. And where health inequity is
growing at an alarming rate. In fact, right here in Chicago,
residents of the West Side — our neighbors — have a life
expectancy that is a full 16 years shorter than residents of
neighborhoods only a few miles away.
I think Dr. Gayle said nine miles. Perhaps not surprisingly then,
Rush’s success has somewhat baffled the bio-medical
community. In fact, Rush was once described
to me by outsiders as an enigma shrouded in mystery. How can an institution enjoy
such success in the face of these overwhelming challenges?
Since coming to Rush, I have begun to understand. Rush is not
simply an institution. It is a philosophy. A shared vision. A
belief that by working together we can bring about meaningful,
positive change in people’s lives. At Rush, we understand that
transforming health care is not just about better health care. It is about better health – for
all of us. At Rush, we understand that to improve the
health of the population, we must have an authentic
commitment to community, and to ending health inequities. That
means education programs, research programs, clinical
programs, and community programs all pointed in the same
direction: improving health. These are the hallmarks of the
Rush tradition. Medical institutions are about
providing the best care to every patient every day. Universities are about building
a better future. Rush University, a pure health
sciences university that is fully integrated within a thriving health system,
of the highest quality is uniquely positioned to build a
better future for health care, and for a healthier world. Our plan for Rush University as a catalyst for change centers around three pillars: “Learn”
“Discover” and “Thrive”. The first pillar is “LEARN.” We
will educate the next generation of health care leaders, and
build a unique health sciences & health professional learning
community. With innovative inter-professional education,
we’ll help prepare the next generation to address the future
healthcare needs of Americans, and to contribute to the
transformation of American healthcare. Our second pillar is “DISCOVER”.
    At Rush, we will advance knowledge to improve health. We
will discover and disseminate new knowledge through
collaborative research and leadership in the health
sciences, health delivery, and health policy. We will emphasize
biomedical sciences, and also quality of care, community
health equity, and population health. And we’ll leverage Rush’s strong
tradition of service and social responsibility together with our
deep expertise in health analytics. Our third pillar is “THRIVE”.  
At Rush, we are a family. And, we value every family member. We are more dedicated than ever
to creating an environment where all members of our family
thrive. We’ll focus on innovative
wellness, engagement, communication, mentoring
programs, diversity, and inclusion. Our guiding
principles are the Rush I-CARE values of innovation,
collaboration, accountability, respect and excellence. This plan, and these principles,
are what differentiates Rush University. And what positions us to be a
catalyst for healthcare transformation. I accepted the role of Rush
University president because I was impressed by the work being
done here; by the tradition of quality and leadership; and
by the trajectory of the institution. Since coming to Rush, what I’ve
been most impressed by is you. Your commitment to solving these
great challenges in health care, and your belief that we are much
stronger and more successful when we work together. We’re
going to keep doing more of that. As president, I’m committed to
fostering a culture that empowers all of us to learn,
discover and thrive. I couldn’t be more excited to
serve as your president, and to help build that future with all
of you. Thank you all. And good evening. (Applause) Wow, yes.
Thank you, Dr. Gabriel, for those moving and
inspireing comments. Yes.
Yes. (Laughing)
No university is better positioned to address the issues we will face
as a nation than Rush University. We are fully integrated within a
leading academic health system and one of the only of very few
U.S. universities solely focused on health sciences. And with Dr. Sherine Gabriel
leading the way, there’s no question in my mind
that Rush University will create, model, and deliver innovative solutions to
old problems. We will face the challenges of
the future as opportunities for
change. Those are Sherine’s words.
She keeps on saying it’s an opportunity.
We fully realize the amazing potential that every one of us
today sees in Rush to make a difference in
healthcare education. Congratulations, Sherine, to
you, your family, far distant away the sons that are listening
to us today on this remarkable day. And welcome to Rush University,
President Gabriel. I speak on behalf of the Rush
University System for Health when I wish you the absolute best in your tenure as
the fourth President of Rush
University. (Applause) (Music)

Author Since: Mar 11, 2019

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