Political vocabulary and expressions in English


Hi, there, guys. I thought I’d better dress
up and put my glasses on today because I have decided to enter politics. Today’s class, we’re
doing political collocations. “Collocations” — what a long, funny word. What does it mean?
Well, “co” generally means “with”, and “location” is a place. So “with place”. Political word
that go together. So “enter”, you often find with politics or center management or a new
thing. Okay? “Enter politics.” “Today, I decided to enter politics.” Great? Got it? “To enter
politics.” Obviously, you can form this verb. “He entered politics when he was 17.” So we
can have the past, “he entered”. Or you can have the future, “He will” — you probably
wouldn’t say “enter”, though. You’d probably say “get into”. “He will probably get into
politics when he’s older.” Okay? “He will” — blah, blah, blah. So “enter”,
present and past, generally. Now, “to hold” — “hold”. “I’m holding a pen.”
You can also “hold” a general election. It means organize, make sure there is a general
election, okay? So David Cameron will hold a general election next year or the year after.
I should know. I don’t. “To hold a general election.” So often, we’re going to use
that with the future tense, “will hold”. Or you could do it with the past tense. “A general
election was held in 1992.” So, “A general election was held.” Okay? So you’ve
got an irregular verb there. Now, “to stand for something”. If you want
to become an important person, you need to stand for positions of authority and importance.
“To stand for the presidency.” Yeah, I’m standing here right now, but you can “stand” for a
position. So “to stand” for the presidency, if you’re in North America. Or in the UK, we
might say “stand for the position of prime minister”. But normally, you would get voted.
People are going to say, “You, you, you.” Okay? You don’t normally put yourself
forward for the prime minister position. “To launch a campaign.” I’m launching a rocket
into space, okay? I’m beating the Russians. I’m beating the Americans. Benjamin, EngVid,
launching a space rocket. Okay? But we can also use “launch” with a “campaign”. Notice the
funny spelling, the -aign, but it’s pronounced “cam-pain”. Okay? One of those words where
the spelling doesn’t look like the sound of the word. “To launch a campaign”, a campaign.
So I might put posters up all over London saying — I wouldn’t do this, okay, because
I’m not, you know, an idiot, but, “Vote for Boris Johnson.” Okay? I put a campaign. “Everyone,
do this. Do this.” It’s a campaign. I want people in London to do this. A campaign. I
want them to take action. I really wouldn’t do that. No. “To win an election”, okay? You “win” or “lose”
an election. The labor party might win the next general election in the UK. That’s my
little prediction. Have a little bet on me. “To win an election”, right? Okay? Win or
lose it. You don’t — in football, we talk about winning or losing or drawing. You don’t
really draw an election, unless you’re David Cameron, in which case you sort of have a
bit of a partnership with Nick Clegg. Okay. “To serve four years as” — of course, the
number doesn’t have to be four. It could be seven. So you could say, “I served for several
years on a committee.” Okay? So this is just a number that you put in and then what it
is that you did. So, “I served five years as a trivia quiz host in London.” Okay?
I’m serving. It’s an act of giving. I’m cutting up my meat for my dinner. But
you can also “cut the crime rate”. Yeah? If you’re in an inner city ghetto, you need the crime
rate to be cut so there are fewer muggings. Yeah? “Cut crime” — yeah, this is bad activity.
“Rate” — how often it happens. If you cut it, it happens less. “To
cut the crime rate.” Now, I might want to leave politics. Yeah? We
talk about “leaving” — exiting. You wouldn’t say, “I exit politics.” “I leave politics
to pursue” — that’s a lovely word. Let’s get that up on the board. “To pursue” — to
do something else. Right? Good. Try and use this word. It’s one
of my favourites. Now, an “economic boom”. That’s a time when
— I don’t know if you do, sort of, stocks and shares. I don’t because I don’t have any
money. But it’s when the charts sort of go up and down. Okay? So an “economic boom” is
when you’re going up. Yeah? An “economic boom”. You can have depressions and all those kinds
of things. I’m not an economist, though, so don’t quote me. An “economic boom”. Okay, my
collocations — two words that go together, just not in 2013. “A proud achievement”, okay? So our noun would
be “pride”, yeah? And when I want to use “pride” as an adjective, I would say “proud”, okay? A
“proud achievement”. This is my noun here. An “achievement” is when
you do something good. So why don’t you go and achieve something
good and get ten out of ten in your little quiz now, okay? You’ll find it on www.engvid.com.
You’re very welcome to subscribe to my YouTube channel and find all sorts of weird videos
about learning English. And if you want to soar like a bird to the top of the English
mountain, then get in touch with me via Exquisite English with the link here. Well done. I
hope you’ve learned to communicate smoothly and effectively in the arena of politics. Enter
politics. Hold a general election, and get voted in. Stand up for the presidency, for a
position you want to get. Launch the campaign. Win an election. Serve for years and years
until you become grey. Cut the crime rate, and then leave politics to pursue another dream,
an economic boom. Make sure that achievement happens, guys. See
you next time.

Author Since: Mar 11, 2019

  1. really appreciated your video! you helped me understand more about politic area (a little bit). waiting for your new videos!

  2. I wouldn't enter politics for all the tea in China.Politics is often dirty and there is lots of corruption in it but I'm aware of what's going on with politics especially in my country.

  3. Benjamin,
    You might put posters up all over London but you are not an idiot!
    You know that it takes a lot of money. If you are really dressed up it must be for the labour party( I am afraid that conservatists don't approve pink)
    If you are able to cut your meat for your dinner you are also able to cut the crime rate.
     I have a serious question. Do you leave engvid to pursue * your new dream?
    But … you are using engVid to gain popularity… You behave like a thoroughbred politician!

    Best regards
    Renata
    *I didn't quote you as an economist, it's simply your lovely word:)

  4. Mmm… to leave and to pursue are not synonyms, right? To leave politics means not to do it anymore, but to pursue politics means to continue doing it. Do I get it right?

  5. It's great! Study and have fun. I love your lessons, but when a video about health theme?… I'm nurse!!

  6. During the whole lesson I was always thinking you would say something about Vladimir Putin -:) I'm joking! Nice job! Greeting from Russia!

  7. Aside from standing for the presidency, one can also run for president…
    And you wouldn't launch a campaign asking people to vote for Boris Johnson because you're not an idiot? =)) that's hilarious.

  8. such a good thing I've noticed in your video! how you explain not just the whole phrase but also each word in it! I find it very helpful please stick to this way!

  9. I am a Taiwanese English teacher.
    (我是一個台灣的英文老師)

    The reason why my English is so good in comparsion with most of my fellow Taiwanese is that I have been constantly learning and practicing English.
    (我英文能力之所以比其他台灣大多數同胞來得強是因為我不間斷地學習與練習英文)

    Hopefully the average Emglish ability level for Taiwanese can improve a lot in the very near future.
    (希望台灣的平均英語實力能在不久的將來大大地進步)

    I have finished watching this video completely.
    (我已經完整地看完了這個影片)

    This video is awesome!!!!
    (這個影片棒呆了!!!)

    It is bloody useful!!
    (真是夭壽實用!!!)

    Big thanks to the teacher and all the fellow students around the world.
    (大大地感謝老師與所有其他國籍的學生)

  10. Is "run for" a synonym for "stand for" ? Are they both popular when talking about someone who is going to take a position in government?

  11. Thanks Ben this is exactly what I was looking for, it s great. the quiz is on https://www.engvid.com/political-vocabulary-expressions/#quiz

  12. How beautiful to talk with British accent , I really trying hard but I can't hhh just a little bit and some words , hope I can do this accent soon

  13. I just love your teaching becz
    I have been searching this type of lesson …..
    I used to get confuse while i listen to international political issue..
    My first language is Gurung language typically native of Nepal
    And english is my third language i came to know this after i cross through two native language😊

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