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2019 0326 social justice lecture andre brock

2019 0326 social justice lecture andre brock



criminy I am nothing toy the chair of the department of languages science on behalf of the department I welcome you to tonight's very special election cities as system a upon man lecture with our first speaker dr. Brock this lecture series is created to reflect of all issues or social justice as libraries and librarians are tested to provide information access and services for community so librarians are in irritability a social justice issue and must be aware and English of our their community social issues so in addition the lecture series supports our department missions in advancing the dialogue between faith and reason cultivating a commitment to service in accord with the mission of Catholic University of America so it offers us a time to focus on time this issue the meaning of social justice and space to think of our ethical engagement and education to improve society so now to tell you about the sisters they are human and introduce tonight's esteemed speaker it is my pleasure to introduce to you dr. Danada chance [Applause] hello everyone hello thank you dr. joy for the introduction I am dr. Barnard Chancellor and I'm gonna take a little bit about sister Thea moment and I'm gonna introduce her speaker so sister dear boom as she was an an educator a social justice advocate and yes she was at that she attended she had her her undergraduate degree from Viterbo College and La Crosse Wisconsin and while she was there she decided to enter the comment she went on to earn a master's degree and a PhD in English from Catholic University here and she in academia for about 16 years she decided to retire from academia full-time and she decided to relocate to Mississippi where she worked as a director of intercultural exchange and it was there when she really started she got interested in social justice issues and really trying to bring the community together and try to deal with a lot of these issues her programs were folk and designed to break down racial racial and cultural barriers she believed that through communication and understanding of other cultures and ethnicities racial injustice could be minimized and one of the she she was just a wonderful person I had the pleasure of meeting her many years ago briefly she says passed on and she was known for just being very uplifting very engaging the community music and she always had these wonderful quotes that she would say and one quote specifically that she said I think it's a nice introduction of a into introducing dr. Rock she said she said in my quote I don't make sense of I don't make sense of suffering I try to make sense of life and I think that's profound because it speaks to the fact that there's a lot of injustice that's going on in society and and within our communities regarding whether it's cry homelessness or murder or just simply outright racism but she also speaks to the fact that there should be some type of understanding or its election discussion on intellectual discourse on what these things mean and so I think that's a perfect way to kind of introduce our tonight speaker now dr. Andre Roth and I go back to graduate school so I've known it for quite a while he is a rigorous scholar who I follow on Twitter and if you don't follow him you really should he's really engaging yeah his research he's an associate professor of black digital media at Georgia Tech he received his master's in English rhetoric from Carnegie Mellon in Pennsylvania and he has mastered he s PhD in Library and Information science from the University of Illinois at urbana-champaign its research examines social representation and video games of black women and web blogs whiteness blackness and digital techno culture that's a whole lot so in that means you guys are in for a treat tonight he had his forthcoming book that he talks about his book is entitled distributed blackness african-american cyber cultures will be published this year from this fall I should say from New York Press NYU pressed it offers an innovative approach to understanding black everyday lives mediated by digital digital technologies so let's give a warm welcome [Applause] can everyone hear me so a word of warning talk fast so if you need me to slow down just give me the hands I love it slow down all right very happy to be here thank you Renata and dr. Troy for inviting me this is a really actually kinda auspicious occasion for me I haven't had I haven't had the opportunity to talk to a library and information science audience for a while so I feel kind of sort of feel like I'm at home hopefully we'll continue to make you feel like coming home and not throw stuff at me right today I want to talk about policing black men and bad data or lack technical objects and the genesis of this presentation came to me in the midst of an argument I mean discussion they're an often hard to distinguish about the utility of afrofuturism to understand black technical practice I know that my abstract definitely sold some more tickets today's talk will not spend much if any time on broken windows policing or the role of hip-hop and codify Blackman as technical objects because while I was doing the research for this talk I became fascinated with the ways of slavery and accounting contributed to the informational ization of black bodies right so I hope that these thoughts that I've assembled which much credit to the authors whose works I've been consuming over the last few weeks go some way to illuminating the path between modernity information but also accounting and algorithms as factors in constituting black folk first as technical objects and then hopefully I can show you a path source talking about black focused technical agents in my recent work I've been theorizing blackness and technology or black techno homesman it's an interesting pursue because America was built upon black men women and children as objects objects appear objects of Labor objects of pathology and even of violence blacks are constantly on the front lines of technical and social cultural fixes to social problems where they are the social problem indeed for many institutions including libraries education and policing technology is positioned as the most efficient solution to discipline long-standing social ills exemplified by black deviance nevertheless my upcoming book argues that black folk are natural and expert users of technology in the process casting them as black technical subjects and agencies well I could use the recent movie Black Panther as compelling cinematic evidence for that I instead turned to my love books and I would like to offer you Victor Green's Negro motorist green book as an example of the first black author Network browser greetings vision as a traveler over America's developing infrastructure developing automobile infrastructure of highways gas stations rest stops and leisure activities was deeply concerned with the context of white supremacist law practice and belief through which these roads traveled his vision was to provide black motorists with a guide to locations where they could rest refuel or even relax so the Green Book Bank can be understood as more than a phone book or a catalog instead it was the Yahoo open directory of this day I should pause do y'all remember Yahoo open because I know sometimes it's young holy you're like what yeah no okay good so we're good it provided information about a network signaling nodes of black life that black motorist could avail themselves up during their journeys so the question I've been working towards across my entire research stream are are twofold one our pathology and deviance the only motives for black online sociality and then from there to how to understand black digital practice as productive life-giving online behavior I could pursue to the concept of black techno culture of necessity depends upon encumbering or rien covering American society and Western Technicolor with their own practices of white supremacy trying to counter what Charles Mills calls an epistemology of ignorant situating technical innovation and progress within the often brutal social cultural and ideological context in which they began and thrive so the genocide of indigenous folk or the importation of African slaves to grow crops in the matter from with their own technical expertise 'as for the benefit of English Dutch Spanish French and other plant colour colonial enterprises across the water for the book I'm theorizing a black cultural relationship with technology drawing upon the black experience in the West and experienced shape our whiteness with our own communities and with technology from a social political subject position so I have a matrix these six things I have up on the screen and but I only focus on one the presentations about one today but I highlight two more for little clarity so the six qualities are blackness modernity America intersectionality invention and style and the future blackness for this matrix stands for the metaphysical and critical valence is of black cultural identity revolving around subjectivity and cultural production this phrasing does not ignore the black lives matter of it all or the civil rights movement so they does not ignore the political or ideological aspects of black identity but instead highlights the libidinal the everyday element the elements driving everyday aspects of blackness relationship with technology or the communitarian enactment of intentionality across social aspects of that culture and Fred Moton caused this blackness is irreducibly social you may have noticed that I have an asterisk next to America and I did this because even though my work is us centered I need to acknowledge that blackness and across across the middle passage is diasporic right and so it signals that the United States is but one context for diasporic blackness a nigerian living in britain has some shared markers of blackness but also many different experiences that constitute their identity for this book however blackness is ineffably american america as an ideal as an institution and as a set of racialized practice is the the cradle of black american blackness that is America is well suited as a technological ideal for black men fact techno culture because America the nation created blackness in order to survive a thriver condition which Toni Morrison calls african-american Africanism one of my favorite anecdotes I don't know if you're familiar with the work of Andrew Sullivan the pundit and occasional gadfly and one of the things he said as a British expatriate he said that white Americans have no idea how black they are and that noise has kind of stuck with me Baldwin says something similar Baldwin said that once he James Baldwin said once he relocated to America he realized that even though he was meeting people from African colonial possessions he in and of himself was still in America right so it's hard to extricate your blackness from the national context in which it is created American ideals inform black community believes in equality democracy and fairness even as black folk live every day based on the understanding that the American Telos of progress depends upon anti blackness the meat of today's presentation the rest of it will revolve around late modernity from the period of colonial slavery in the Americas through today for black technoculture modernity is precisely the informational capitalistic and institutional regime of anti blackness surveillance and Sue's valence my colleague at Macomb Community College Chris Chris gilyard has also talked about something called digital redlining right access to education and testing standards for our city blues anyone even voting rights are all positioned in ways that limit if not directly injured black folks on the way to reify awareness for example where modernity and capitalism insists that work is a Mansa to emancipatory and a gent –iv that is owning your own business being an entrepreneur is the ultimate state of being in the American capitalistic society black folk have long understood that work only signifies servitude misery and subordination analyses of black modernity then require attention to formal attributes of expressive culture and a distinctive moral basis Paul Gilroy when talking about black modernity writes the particular aesthetic which the continuity of expressive culture preserves derives not from this and rational evaluation of the artistic subject but from an inescapable subjective contemplation of the mimetic functions of artistic performance and the processes of struggles towards the emancipation citizenship and eventually autonomy so let me translate black Twitter I mean if I put it in that sense does that make sense right so black Twitter is not concerned with propriety productivity or efficiency in many cases it's much more concerned with aesthetic expressions of cultural critique political critique and articulations of the self so enough about me let's talk about the stuff my finger so I have to talk I talk about black technoculture first because I want to give you the grounds from which I'm critiquing Western technology Western Technicolor has been deployed to conserve blackness as social death through slavery through Jim Crow eugenics chronology so there's a scientistic basis social science criminal law and segregation and these arrangements ratified technoculture as to how to do things to black bodies and blackness so my task when I set out to talk about black Technicolor was how to understand how to reincorporate blackness in a space where it wasn't just Chapel there's too many slides so there's a Western technoculture matrix upon which my black techno cultural matrix is composed and this is composed by Joel Dean Erskine and he argues that Western technoculture and his first argument is that technology is the American religion all right well for Western technoculture is driven by six beliefs progress religion modernity whiteness masculinity and the future and we can flesh all these things out there in Q&A but today I want to focus on the inner scenes reference to whiteness he introduced these concepts and a journal article so as you can imagine he didn't have a lot of time to flesh out the relationship between whiteness modernity and blackness so I'm here to do for it right what I want to do here is drill down into specifics whiteness as anti blackness and how it can be quantified and commodified for capitalist profit and for cultural capital for example consider the expense laid aggregate at once a commodity of worker and a being Western capitalism and American government Alateen needed to constrain these black bodies into shapes more amenable to use in a political economy the US Constitution render black bodies as three-fifths of a being for political promoting purposes yet unable to exercise a vote leading to the creation and yes I've been listening to Elizabeth Warren leading to the creation of the electoral college as a strategy to defuse the immense political power of the suddenly populous southern states the condition which it still exists today similarly black bodies work immensely valuable to the slavery to slavery capitalism all right a healthy black male slave in the 1830s was worth the equivalent of sixty thousand dollars in today's economy right thanks to their lifelong enslavement and subsequent rendering of their labor efforts as value to their owners and this is the point where my students when I talk about this stuff a glass eye well not everybody owned slaves right my point is if there's a Mercedes dealership somewhere in the vicinity there are also car washes there are also maintenance shops there are also tire settlers there are also people who sell luxury goods for which you can ride in your Mercedes with there's an entire economy built around these things so even if you don't own the Mercedes you can in some way benefit from that luxury good as part of your everyday life so no excuses you don't get to be let out so let's talk a little bit more about whiteness modernity particularly colonial modernity and black technical objects the image I have behind the text here is the account of Negroes and I took this from Rosenthal's accounting for slavery and what this is is this the manager of this plantation created an inventory of capital assets and an org chart it illuminates the human cost of chattel slavery while reflecting the complexity of plantation operations there are 29 categories listed here listing things as disparate as pig drivers iron workers fellows pushers and the leg right and so alongside these occupational categories planters classified children and the elderly by sex and age and also the reproductive capacity of women slaves right one of the things that's apparently a constant for slavery presentations is that the rate of deaths always exceeds the rate of births because slavery is a brutal operate I'm sorry slavery took sugar sugar creation is a brutal operation many people lost limbs if not lives burnt to death be bitten by snakes alike right this document offers a view of the plantation workforce both as it is and as it would evolve over the coming years and the skills of the lost skills of the dead could be read from the chart asking the availability of growing children who could be trained to take their places so when I found this I have another document open in my browser because of like you I have 1700 tabs open at the same time and it was a document by a Google data science researcher and what they said is when we segment our data into sub populations by characteristics of interests members are not randomly assigned rather they are chosen deliberately and suffer from selection bias and those two things clicked for me right so even though it seems kind of overwhelming to say slavery is the context of which we should understand black bodies it's also clear that the the delineation of interest is what makes them valuable for this particular social structure continue with Rosenthal's here I said the ideal plantation was a model of efficiency its premise was black inferiority and while plantations have been typically considered as pre-modern enterprises some places reformed refer to them as part of the ostian regime which predates modernity there are complex labor structures accounting practices invention immense managerial of techniques to constrain and control labor up to and including death and infusions of venture capital the gain of investors in planters rather than the state mark them is clearly modern I understand there's a show called superstore on NBC right and if you look at the ways in which people live dark so my friends have a drinking game every time I gave a presentation they take drink every time I say the ways in which so you didn't bring up your hand right so super store is a fictionalized representation of a Walmart and I say one more unreal well mark but it also shows how labor practices in some ways have not changed the overwhelming surveillance the control of the workers personal lives in order to maximize the profits of the store the it also gives a little too much sympathy to managerial interests having to deal with the resistance that workers naturally have and the dictates of increasing productivity and efficiency right but think of that and add the fact that the workers on these plantations could never leave lifelong servitude right their reproductive capacities even who they could leave with as a family unit was completely controlled by the plantation owners and these plantation owners the forerunners of Harvard Business ago often conducted experiments both predicted both for productivity of crop yields but also for making laborers more efficient at their given tasks all right so it's definitely a modern enterprise slaves were valued alongside livestock as economic commodities which help to ensure obscure their humanity and reinforce the commonly expressed view of planters and southern aristocracy that slavery was about business not exploitation investment by absentee landlords would have been impossible without a regular flow of accounting data from their Caribbean managers and agents so despite the fact that these absentee landlords did not directly interface with the slaves on a regular daily basis accounting is the link between the two Rosenthal argues that allows us to understand how information aliy people be could be converted into units that were then exploited in use slavery capitalism quantify and enslave people cataloging I love saying catalog each any of the people you all get that look cataloguing classifying and measuring according the traits of age gender beauty skin color strength and these data practices reduce people to commodities and they were traded as such irrespective of family ties personal desires and aspirations or indeed their very status as human beings so at least for this slip this slide I want to say that white supremacist racism underpins and this is Rosenthal's argument I'm totally stealing a tremor white supremacist racism is clearly the forerunner and the continuing practices of today's managerial culture right the key principle is a separation of conception from execution modern managers do the thinking while leave leaving workers with the task of implementation racism was used to justify the assumption of this right to manage attempts were made to impose a consciousness of personal inferiority slaves had to feel that their African ancestry tainted them right think of a similar case for gender basis where women are made to feel that their health concerns their parenting concerns their the fact that they have to manage this whole entire household outside the work argument meant to make them feel inferior in the workplace making them less capable of doing the work supposedly that men do black people categorizes the moral and intellectual inferiors of whites suitable only for drudgery and for beseeching management I don't know why that phrase stuck with me but it did so my smarter students the ones who come to me from history like to say well you know all these trees are these Enlightenment thinkers they weren't about that slavery they were talking about the free market and utilitarianism the like as it turns out that one one in particular John Locke who was a writer on civic freedom and human liberty happened to own slaves and invested in Caribbean death plantations right he also wrote the constitution for South Carolina if that makes any sense to you there is no conflict between him riding on civic freedom and human liberty and owning slaves because environment discourse promotes that slavery was progressive and developmental for both parties to the power relationship it justified the civilization of African and indigenous slaves while celebrating entrepreneurship upon the natural exploitation of labour the slave plantation then developed as evidence of institutional commitment to enlightenment principles to modern principles of economic rationality civilizing modernity and entrepreneurial freedom thus epitomizing capitalist principles of large-scale production surplus generation and accumulation of wealth through foreign trade to get to this point plantation plant planters blended information systems requirements and the threat of sale to refine labor processes building machines of men women and children and accounting complemented violence and terror binding multiple strategies into a rationalized web of control Rosenthal goes on and on talking about the role of the overseer / manager the person was designated as the whip hand in order to one kind of sort of enforce order among the unruly slaves but also to determine how their application of punishment helped increase the effectiveness of a plantation itself so and they have to write this down as a tally there wasn't just oh I'd be somebody today it's time for a beer it was not be somebody because of X and this is how it effected this particular process all right so accounting knit production violence religious authority and spiritual teller and irrational and complex information systems brutal legal structures as well slave codes the refuge of this runaway act but also such small things when considered as having slaves having to have passes to leave their masters property and travel along the road system underpin and institutionalize their masters cruelty these coasts set out procedures for punishing the enslaved and increasing the Alliance and legal status using racial division as a tool for policing so Rosenthal talks about control I think control is important to understand from modernity right because in many ways we use information systems as a means to control the population not to discipline them but to control the machine argues that could the word itself comes from an accounting document the contrary rule and I'm sure I pronounced it wrong or counter roll a duplicate of a rule or other document which was kept for the purposes of cross-checking and its origins the word first met verification but by the late 16th century it had come to encompass the direction Management and surveillance that verification required these margins are often overlooked today even though the top accounting officer in a corporation is still called the comptroller right through slavery became a laboratory for developing accounting because a controlled run on paper match the reality of the plantation more closely than that of almost any other early American business enterprise so I kind of had fun with this part if you couldn't tell but I need to take a sidestep so I make the linkage between accounting and actuarial tables all right before I get to that point let me actually read what I have as my notes for Western Technicolor their modernity equals precise data to the management of black bodies supplemented by violence right Lavelle who wrote about accounting and his ethical practices considered the possibilities of an inner moral base to the practice of accounting for saging today's arguments about ethics and algorithms he argued that while the counting practice exists in a wider social economic and political context it is inadequate to excuse its moral base on the grounds that it reflects the prevailing values and beliefs of modernity instead the accounting profession is powered by the fear of antagonizing the business community and the state which causes it to leave its members to resolve ethical dilemmas as private issues then it's not like Facebook all right Facebook refuses to accede to the moral and ethical demands of the government's at its end it says it's a private issue it's something that they can work out Mark Zuckerberg and publish an entire medium post on how they're going to make Facebook a community without ever addressing the real harms that they inflict upon his members by sharing their personal data for their own gain right I wanted to sneak in a little bit of Foucault because I needed to be declared that I'm separating accounting and actuaries from discipline Foucault disciplines our defensive strategy seeking to fix and neutralize the mobile and dangerous elements of a population you know like how we break down doctoral students to make the B color message these are techniques of surveillance and training and combining detailed knowledge of the individual with methods of organizing my new individual actions to alter individual behavior and motivation while supplanting techniques of violence and intimidation discipline works around a norm and power seeks to move those subjects towards uniformity right however actuarial were technical apart are a regime of truth a way of exercising power and ordering social life and actuary stuff became really interesting I got to it before I got to the accounting part but once I understood how accounting is slavery worked to codify black bodies as information for exploitation actuaries made a lot more sense so one of the canonical actuary actuarial projects as Frederick Hoffman raised traits and tendencies of the American Negro this was solicited by Prudential Insurance heard of them in response to a wave of state laws banning discrimination against Blacks this document race trades argued that black folk were and are insurable actuarial practice seeks to map out the distribution within a population and arrange strategies to maximize the efficiency of the group as it stands or to manage them in place so instead of trying to coerce them to become better people it just attempts to exploit their differences to control them as they are they fragment the individual into commodify or risk based products which can be sold or more importantly for black people can be denied resources redlining is a really good example of this all right they differ from earlier classification schemes homosexuality or mental illness and that there is little possibility for those classified subjects to resist the powers that constituted them if you're attempting to buy a house and a red and you've been steered to a red light area what opera opportunities do you have to buy a house right this is a product of actuarial practice they abrogate data which diminishes the Western belief in individualism while reifying anti-black beliefs about black bodies have not highlighted they predict future outcomes suggesting that our outcomes are predetermined by their calculations rather than by our attend our intention so it removes agency from you're always going to be what the algorithm predicts the actuarial base algorithm predicts you're going to be right and they treat difference as an instrumental rather than a social politically significant characteristic which obscures both historical difference discrimination and modern remedies and my favorite part about that last sentence is it's actually something I've understood it's doubly for years and it's encapsulated by the phrase happens to be black right so that my blackness is an instrumental quality not necessarily a product of structural environmental political and aesthetic discrimination does that make sense it's something that instrumentally is applied to me and thus can be acted upon and when individuals once understood as moral irrational actors are increasingly understood as locations and actuarial tables power shifts from manipulating individual choices to situating subjects according to the risk they pose so there's no opportunity for redemption it's just that they're trying to find and predict which one of you is going to be the bad one right this is less expensive than discipline because changing people is difficult and costly we'd rather incarcerate them the rehabilitation patterns of domination remain while the ideological consequences of creating a contested class has been relegated to infrastructure or cope can code discriminate we can ask the social status agri-cover rhythms of welfare or pay no sentencing Racecraft Karen fields and Barbara fields argue is first and foremost an ongoing set of social practices that continuously misconstrue racism for race the former is a function of power inequality whereas the latter is purportedly grounded and biology and culture by focusing on the inherent qualities of groups whether residing in genes or values the analysts lose sight of the larger context in which those differences are concerned in the first place conjured nothing because in the same way that witches need not exist for people to feel the effects of witchcraft so too with race genetic differences with racial groups Nina actually exists for such claims to exercise political and social effects so for me I'm arguing that actor will take actuarial tables and the algorithms that they're based upon can be understood as race craft and Rob Benjamin offers the example of Michael Browns murder in Missouri where the media described said this is a race graphic example for the media describe an event as an unarmed teenager was shot because he was black Racecraft prefers power into difference and so far as the young man's race as being black has given agency an ontology thereby veiling the work of multiple forms of racism that led to a law enforcement official to shoot this young man to death Brown's blackness did not pull the trigger as the original formulation mistakenly asserts rather deeply entrenched forms of ideological paranoia institutional pathology racial profiling and predictive policing which contain Lee complete blackness with criminality ensured that Darren Wilson saw Michael Brown as a threat in the social context characterized by race craft causal relationships are it's typically stated incorrectly Brown was not shot because he was black he is black because he was shot all right that is racist the result of the power some people of others and too often and the way the scholars formulate questions and the way that technologist formulating algorithms right to make sense of social disparity subjugation is posited as an inevitable outcome have inherent racial difference even when the historical record does not support it so I'm trying to work my way out of this dystopian dystopian president that I've worked oh Santa give me a second so I follow a Creed called afro optimism which is not as happy as it sounds and particularly the writings of Fred mode but Moulton here arguing about afro pessimism which is closely linked to is that the cultural and political discourse on black mythology has been so pervasive that it could be said to constitute the background against against which all representations of blacks blackness or even the color black takes place and this in turn helps to echo David the oak oversee assistance that racism constitute help to constitute and so are crucial to modern state making states become modern are drawn into the modern world order in good part by being conceived and conceiving of themselves in racial terms it is also I contend increasingly the case that to maintain remain modern and to exercise power and the current will order states must innovate new ways to police boundaries the example a great example an unfortunate example would be how ice has stepped up their techniques of compartmentalization arrests enforcement and deportment right we've got men to me contends that visions of development and progress are too often built upon forms of social and political subjugation that require upgrading in the form of novel techniques of classification and control but scholars set out to study the values and assumptions of Technica and desires that safe times technology we must also remain attentive to the racial anxieties and fears that shape the design of technoscience the era of big data for example is intertwined with the fabrication of big deviance right which has its grounds in slavery into a court a complementary extent Jim Crow and prison labor has talked about by Michelle Alexander right and a recent report on machine bias researchers illustrated how computer risk assessment tools are biased against black Americans and this is actually why slavery became important for me again because it's easy to say tools are biased against black Americans without taking that head at that moment to do that historical excavation to understand that language is between black labor black deviants and modernity it's not quite as clear so the computer risk assessment tools bias against black Americans they were particularly likely to falsely flag black defendants as future criminals wrongly labeling them this way at almost twice the rate as white defendants in this algorithmic discrimination is not limited to police work it happens in higher education and health care settings and many more so for me part of the take away for this is that black people dealing are either degraded in popular representations of progress legislated out of contemporary society or completely written out of futuristic visions a kind of temporal penitentiary right and which oppressed people are locked into a dystopic presence in contemporary times this can be seen as the right in the rise of algorithmic models and practices designed to make one's governmental concerns more efficient or not even government of public facing the replacement of reference librarians and library workers with self-serve kiosks where people can swipe their books and go through all right this further reduces and restricts resources intended to aid those are ready at risk of suffering under these ideological regimes Ruben Amaro notes that what we experienced today is algorithmic presence prejudice is a materialization of overriding logic of correlation and hierarchy hidden under the illusion of objectivity in other words Mark Zuckerberg is not racist in his heart it just so happens that the the Machine that he built happens to produce races outcomes objectively right meanwhile effective substances of race and racialization work to disrupt self actualization by reinforcing the false assumption of coherence predictive policing and since its infancy algorithms drawing upon data conceived and gathered on the basis of black pathology I was shocked when I realized that predictive policing is based on weather modeling and disease modeling right which has certain assumptions built-in right and they leave black folk more and more vulnerable to out or regular pronouncements of black deviance of morgue unmoored from considerations of human agency cultural context or white supremacist activity I've been asked a lot recently maybe because I probably got promoted to be part of discussions about ethics and algorithms and I'm kind of on the fence about it and I'm on the fence about it because I don't see it as a fix with the problems of technoculture right it's again a technical solution to the problem that deeply held moral problems moral and cultural problems everywhere so everyday basis and my example is doctors have a code of ethics right but for some strange reason black women in the US routinely experienced the highest rates of mortality in childbirth how is ethics fixing that right and that's not something that this can address ethics isn't meant as a code of Professional Conduct perhaps instead we should be talking about a moral code of harm reduction we're deployed when deploying complex algorithm solutions to social problems I'll come back to that kind of penida similarly and this should be familiar to you as lis practitioners diversity is not the solution to making institutions or algorithmic culture more accountable my students at Georgia Tech my colleagues at University of Illinois complained bitterly that corporations and higher education have completely eviscerated diversity of all meaning and that one month one of my my smartest students use the example of the it's relatively recent a black woman who is head of Apple HR when called on the carpet because the Apple was promoting a panel of diverse people and happen to be all white men she said you know they helped me to like tool diversity so diversity really only registers as plasticity it's a plastic representation of my Plus bodies it never addresses the complex web of relations standpoints and intersections that color intentional decision-making beyond a body count so my argument is for intersectionality right to take account of those webs of relations that people bring to any set of discussion the tacit and explicit beliefs mostly tacit because the corporate boardroom or your week meetings that you hold weekly that make you really sleepy right are not necessarily the places to bring up your biases and prejudices yes yet they still affect the decisions that are made in their book so Roderick crooks and a bunch of other people including one of my favorite people Tonya Sutherland right recently met to talk about what Big Data what what data science can do to talk about algorithms one things they came up with was offense will call harm reduction which makes a lot of sense to me they argued that we should dissenter putative social goods right as a rationale for fixing algorithmic culture instead they argue for making harm a central principle of developing and analyzing algorithms harm is multivalent and defense and directs attention to individual and collective injury and to response us to threaten wrong the way it can be the sacrifice of one human need to serve another equal vital equally vital on a demand that we surrender autonomy or the demand that we surrender autonomy in exchange for medicine and shelter but it's always prejudice not on everybody should have something but that somebody's got to give up something in order for this thing to work countless systems distribute harm to differently valued bodies according to known historical treasure trajectories of violence exploitation and profit therefore we are always already in mesh and non innocent infrastructures the possibilities for decolonization and turn off the camera I don't think it's going to happen right but we can move from a statement move from a place of racial realism where we recognize the permanence of racism as a as a construct that we will constantly be afflicted with and then that frees us up to imagine creative strategies to work around it to subvert it or even to possibly erase it for time so I haven't talked and my homework about the difference of T a problem in a problematic in part because during my dissertation defense which was my dissertation was about the responses like people online to the problems that the survivors of Hurricane Katrina encountered right they talked about the leaders versus refugees or evacuate I'm sorry those versus finders and refugees versus of Becky's one of my well-meaning classmates asked if my dissertation would solve racism so as you may have heard that before and that's where I began to formulate this idea that what I address are problematic smack problems racism is not something that can be solved but what we do as critical professionals critical information professionals is encourage people to think about the problem and it's ask questions about prevailing situations that are designed to both enlighten the solutions to the problem but also to get people interested and dealing with a chronic personalize so what I have for you is a problematic right and we're back to the black techno cultural matrix and the part I wanna highlight is imagine a style and in part because this part this part really came to the fore when I was studying black Twitter but I think it holds forth for many aspects of black culture overall so the black sense of self is formed informed and reformed at the moment of dissonance between self perception and any externally constructed view of black life these tensions are the conditions from which new iterations of the cells are generated which exceed the reductions of representation or visibility so if you encounter a soap dispenser that's fit that contains a sensor a color sensor that does not want to dispense soap to you because your skin is too dark do you then Rage Against the Machine kick it off the wall and walk out with your hands unwashed or do you find another way to wash your hands on laughs about it whatever ends later right that's the part the second part is the one on Pintrest today they form a recurrent system of feedback that an aquifer Co is called a technologies of the self which permit individuals to affect by their own means or with the help of others a certain number of operations of their own bodies and souls thoughts in conduct ways of being so as to transform themselves in order to achieve a certain state of happiness purity wisdom perfection or even immortality I didn't write that but it's not really good what does that look like for me black Twitter when I mention that early off right black Twitter manifests style in space and the raceless void of social networking services premise around interest of amenities or friends black Twitter deploys discursive identity and intentionality to vilify the service as an emotional construct centered on embody conditioned cognition catharsis and invention lack of aesthetics are intensely libidinal and performative drawing as they do O'Connor history of subjugation black sociality and the community in communitarian ethos of blackness in America and these qualities also distinguish black technoculture from Western technological practice because for black technoculture utility and efficiency are not the ultimate aims if you've ever tried to get serviced at a black restaurant you will know that this is the case the food is good the service might not live up to your expectation the fixed perception of self that has been inflicted upon black folk by modernity and white supremacy or the hail as for non calls you right is a record of what should be and has been under a informational regime identity however isn't is what one does after the hail right I tell this to my undergrads all the time like you your social media captures who you are but that's not the end personally you are what you are is what you do afterwards right so I'm a racial realness I acknowledge the permanence of our subordinate status in American culture which of what allows us to avoid despair I said this already my argument is that style and invention are crucial components of black identity into a larger extent to the ways that we can resist the compulsions of modernity in a Western identity right there how black folk negotiate the information and institutional regimes of anti blackness well they are not solutions to the problem of surveillance in the carceral state they are modes of being that encouraged us to live life to the fullest there's a watchful eye of modernity that's it questions before we exit to our reception so tell me your name my name is Bhavik Zarin what was it okay my question is regarding people to guidance on what you just discussed to say incoming researcher very easy at the beginning of the career path for me there are people getting their degree in actuarial science right now I'm guessing though that the first thing they should not meet upon hearing the librarian by the way is to know there's an even depth in racism in your entire field please stand by then I'll run through a 40 minute representation described in detail but it does also seem strange from a personal viewpoint do not tell them that there is this pinko bias in the things you'll be reading writing reserving and working you need to be aware of that political do you have any insights into how to begin that conversation our Lee Circle in your experiences where that leads to kick off more Library and Information science graduate students are often concerned when confronted with theoretical work because they're like we need to be trained we need to understand how to use the tools that we're going to use once we get hired and actually having sat on the advisory board librarians at various schools are like we need better trains to so we need to bring them in so they can start work right away but my role as a former lis professor and even as a information studies professor now is that if you don't understand the theoretical and historical concepts that your discipline is based on and information is based on you lose right you will always be disciplined you will always be subject to the control of that particular moment and you will never you will always have a dissonance between how do you want to understand people and how your discipline wants to control those people all right so this stuff is always important I always make my students read autonomous article from 2005 you know Todd should open a tripping over the color line but also there's another one that'll make them read now that I can't remember it but I also I always try to introduce critical whiteness right as a space to understand library studies because vibration is a really white profession regardless of all the brown bodies that you see in here right and so getting students to understand that their whiteness is in many ways embedded in the profession is a crucial step towards getting them to be better librarians with dealing with diverse populations and diverse spaces that help people not looking to 30s they should do it no that's one step is to encourage if it's not in the syllabus encourage your professors ask them to add it as a reading the various library schools I've either been a student in or taught n did not have social justice as a part of the curriculum that's something that you can legislate for as a group of students to say this is necessary to understand the ways that it works you're going to give this man oh but without it I think librarianship and information science is take much weaker profession I argue information science is weak anyway because it's a historical and a theoretical right incorporating the cultural biases that inform these particular disciplines is really integral to making them better for the purposes for which we intend which is public service how's that good you got a fight on the head of you good luck yes you're suggesting there there's Texans into authority oh I'm sorry I'm just a lemon said I'm a head of cataloging a personal library a longtime attendee two events here anyway involved another – in DC my question I think that I've seen this person they're a little more has to do with what you're asking or what you're asking and what you're suggesting at it is that if you aren't able to really understand that the matrix if you just work for the profession you're actually working in the matrix so unless you understand how the matrix was built you're never going to be frequently matrix so that's why I know long live you know cannery in spirit so but I guess I went to the section last night or more but the question here is I went to the session last night which had to do with data being compiled in how data which is a durational boxing is one of the Centers over there two-hour long kind of panel session somebody from common cause was talking about all those conundrums of having data rates communities and data poor communities we understand where these situations come about stranger understanding that we can we talk about how the services and infrastructure are they can be built along both no I then means being produced by the data scientists working for those for-profit institutions how do we how do we excite actually believe my facebook account seven years ago I'm at is donated okay but one of the things I asked about then in the same context and the person from Comic Cons asked a similar question how do we react I our individual selves while we're being forced to be categorized by these various technologies and I don't have an answer promises that it's like a period deep and many ways to cat is out of the bag even if you gave up Facebook there are other tools that you use that don't charge you that still records your data exhaust which is a term that I love all the unintentional data that you leave behind as you do things so you may not post anything on Facebook but Facebook records your client your ISP your geographical okay your likes your dislikes your browser it requires all these things right and those things are actually more use of them than actual content that you post because it reveals patterns right this is where algorithms comes into play because they study patterns and then determine risks right so Facebook is now saying that they'll no longer do affinity based marketing of housing or there's another category that there's the user that we're supposed to write because it explicitly located black people despite the fact that it was not marked as black and brown people right so you're kind of already a mesh in this regime there's no way you can do it there are some people who say well you could wear a mask that's designed to frustrate the vision sensors right but even if you do that the GPS that you have in your phone that you drive in your car reveals the past that you travel on an everyday basis so there's no way to avoid it right that's why I say you have to be a realist about it there are some forms especially considering the increasing employment informational ization of our society with Internet of Things and the like you're not going to be able to avoid those things what you can do however is be intentional and be vigilant about the ways that people have to use your data right so one of the things that Georgia Tech is trying to take up is getting people to be more concerned with the privacy settings on Facebook right which is a tricky test because Facebook change them every day I start from a simpler basis here's my question for you how many of you use Microsoft Word okay how many of you know that Microsoft Word saves your document every 10 minutes how many of you still lived with that constraint right so it turns out Microsoft found that most people who use Microsoft Word and never change the settings right and then you mad at Microsoft because it crashed but 10 minutes when you lost the last 10 minutes of furious prose that you were typing to meet a deadline what I say is be aware of them your own capacity to modulate your information environment going to your Microsoft Word settings until it autosave every two minutes I will save you so much pain so much pain and Hanks I think PowerPoint Excel Microsoft Word right those do you think I guarantee I've eased your life at numeral early just by saying those things I'm playing but that's a way to start thinking about modulating your information environment so that it preserves your sanity but also your information integrity right and to the certain extent that's about all you get right when I think about that a rigid data poor environment I was wondering as you spoke if it was actually inverted to me the data rich environments are the ones that policing social welfare services and the like have dedicated immense resources of surveillance to it as opposed to the white suburban neighborhoods which really kind of escape surveillance because they're isolated nuclear family home units to which the castle doctrine applies right and so what does that really mean debt originated of course so the other the other aspect that I was going for with the book is to avoid deficit based models of information use right I try to argue that black people have been and will continue to be expert information users Sophia Noble just did a presentation that she owes me the slides for where she talks about black techni graciousness how we've always used information devices to increase sociality among ourselves right and so be aware that you already have some experts among you that can tell you how to moderate it turns out teens have the best ones and moderating care privacy practices across the various networks in part because they don't watch out long what they don't and if you ask them they will show you because they're happy to demonstrate their expertise that make fun of you for being old fashioned excellent right so turn to the experts the ones who have made technology an inescapable part of their lives to help you manage your data practices that help I'm kind of out of the loop for librarianship like the last time I taught information in culture class was two thousand six or seven so we were still talking about Patriot Act what has changed about being a librarian and talking about surveillance and privacy in the last ten years there's a question for y'all and I yell have this my class now so what has changed in the last 10 years when we're talking about information and surveillance when using computer computer resources and libraries what is the role of librarian in helping to manage that one of the things I think about the time in terms of how I a lot of libraries of course of in you're well aware of this and your own research that the outs or as many of their major services to third-party vendors which are paying a lot of money for as the Catholic University people know there being a lot of money for these various technical services they're aggregating you know EB sources and even the catalog minute and all kinds of things actually reduce all that's there and so I sort of think about that I think about how much more control we could have privacy and surveillance culture if we manage on our own servers you know our own analysis yes it's more mentally constraining but human beings wanting the delete constraint they want to jump in to learn am I wrong I don't know if I want to be mentally constrain us of way in the sense of wanting to learn climb the ladder up to the next knowledge point whatever that is and and from the point of view of privacy then we can choose all the various things locally in a smaller community to not aggregate out of odd apologies for better and easier to not care at all about individual identities so it's ever dissever that's aggregate you know that's one thing I think I do a lot of sort of privacy workshops just on my own graduated stuff but that's personal it's like I've only change the civilizations I don't carry to Allah you're the teacher you're doing right now I know I'm nobody I worked for the man to the seat there's something I think about all the time you know it's when I think about you know that's that's a huge saving X we should be enveloping we should be investing I think small amounts of money but also greater human energy into open-source projects because with this allow us to both educationally and professional development jump in because setup and configuration to those systems but then also minutes of privacy settings and and surveillance culture of it better that's something because open-source has hidden expenses that are not mystery but like for academic librarians how many of you have had to deal with your spaces being converted to information Commons right for public librarians how many of you have incorporated more computational services either gaming consoles or more access to computers in order to encourage more people to come in and enhance their information literacy and how does that change your expectation both of the patrons and the type of services your library provides all right libraries twist our next ten are a patriarchal kind of endeavor Frank they assume that people are coming in because there are coerce they are constrained to want to learn more but what about people who treat the library as a gathering sites as many teams do I went into a library in Silver Spring today and there are a bunch of old people and old black people let me be clear right talking loud this mess of things at the top volume of they're boys and you could see the librarians sitting in a corner of frustrated with them because they're not ideal library patrons right how do you deal with these information customers right in a way that is equitable for them it also works to support the mission of the library these are questions I asked for social justice for the information professionals when I did teach it right because the space is really constitutive of how we understand and treat people and here I'm referring to a little bit to omean Winans racial formation project area right where home my nan argue that social structures determine individual references representations and vice versa so what does a library patron look like right and what does a library look like right how does that library change when it's situated in a benign it neighborhood how does that library change when it's situated and a half one neighborhood what happens when those tonight in neighborhood participants want to come to the good library right how then do you deal with them all right this also has to do with technology so one of the complaints that I remember from my information of school days is these kids come in and they all they want to do is social media right they don't want to do learning modules they don't want to learn how to become Microsoft Office experts they just want to interact with their friends how is that consistent with the admission of the library is it consistent with the mission of the library and for me social justice at least exploring the idea of both of harm reduction but also equitable access to resources addresses those type of things that's just me I know we're not a does this tech work cause you good at right but this is just something from another perspective from a person has been now in three different libraries goals to differ library schools o33 other questions that question our tech yeah or maybe if you talk about like we're school librarians and one you shouldn't in use it this hard testing and you mentioned something like hey you know this is no but my standards like being able to say as a kid I mean a kid of color you know being top of my heart but the system is asking me you have to excel in our course if not but everything that deals with that school librarianship is the toughest row to hoe ever right because in many cases legislatures are seeking to remove them from existence because they don't see them as crucial to the standards-based standards based testing and they feel students need to accept access but I would be nothing as that once our level is adjusting to eliminate librarians the group of government for tomorrow so and so school librarians in a really tough position they were the ones who introduced me to concepts outside of my class to books outside of my classes that they thought would help me become a bigger better person and so I don't really have an answer apart from expend your own personal energies to help supplement whatever the standards-based curriculum czar asking you to do with students to pay attention to those students who perhaps are slightly less motivated or slightly more motivated to get them to understand how the library can help them reach the goals that they want to have or the dreams that they want to have one of the things that really hurt heart when I started teaching school librarianship somebody mentioned that poor children don't really have the capacity to dream right because their world is so constrained by the everyday tenets of survival their dreams are also constrained right and that really hurt my heart but it has a poor kid at one time it made a lot of sense to me right I remember thinking at 12 years old if I've made $30,000 a year he's so rich that's not the case right but also what I can do with that education right what I could do with education or with the resources that I was being offered so as a school librarian I think you guys are on the forefront encouraging kids to find spaces for themselves at least wouldn't you have an explosion of young adult literature that helps children understand complex situations of the way that I did not with Ramona and encyclopedia broom if you have a wider gamut of youth widening literature that can help people these young Co work through their issues of identity and transference and sociality in the life the other part is and so the thing that's been suggested to me recently is that school librarians get invest more in the concept of code academies black girls code but I'm always skeptical of those endeavors because they are neoliberal capitalistic practices that yes these girls do learn how to code but then once they get in the market or once they get into industry they have not been disciplined to deal with the type of prejudice that they're going to get the class's masculine is patriarchy is patriarchal sexist type of additives that they're going to get and I mean there's no easy way to solve that my young women students at Georgia Tech are dealing with us an everyday basis and we talk about it right but a code Academy really does think it's gonna happen it's almost like going to an HBCU and then entering corporate America which is not your supportive environment of your HBCU yes you have the love that you were granted when you were learning this stuff but you also have to learn to deal with all those that comes with this part of that and STEM fields are by nature masculine as patriarchal and sexist right they promote their prose and other mediocre white people you tell me to behave I'm trying to and so introducing young women to that environment without explaining to them the intricacies of that environment to be the problem so there's something to be said for school librarians adding a cultural a social cultural viewpoint to the concept of a Codecademy right that you can provide the wisdom and the cultural knowledge that being a librarian helps you has accrued to understanding that this technical procedure like teaching our students Martin data or or library settings is already always already imbued with things that are going to seek to diminish you and here are some strategies that you can use to suffer that circumvent that is that helpful sorry it was more preaching than anything else have a comment so I am NOT in the library field okay I'm medicated but we work very very closely with the school librarians at my school later I teach in Miami college and a lot of libraries the hood library is working on initiatives to do more interactive communication with the students in our classes I teach English okay fabulous because the students do not come into the library okay you know so so it's very important for the librarians or and I know I know it's it's a the institution within an institution which is within our openness yeah but but it's really important for the librarians to kind of make the students kind of feel welcome so they want to come in and you know do some social media on the computer it gets them on pewter gets them into the library you know I'm looking at some of our public libraries in the District of Columbia they're trying to make it more try to keep the money flowing I guess in the lighting system and so they're you know creating more gathering places you know for the younger generation to kind of come in so I think ability to us to start not because my students don't have to go into the library structure because of the access he used to have to go well some of us instead go into a library into a card cabinet walk to the shelf and look at the journal things like that and our students I get it now so they don't have to do that you know there's nothing like browsing the stacks that pepper on that like I'll never give that up I will always do that yes hi couple done nationally recently just in your last comments it chuckles you know over the last month about secret history of women CODIS and it talks about the presence of women not higher than sixties in computers than they were and the 80s and 90s and and ends on that note that you were connecting about the girls who code and and like ways of providing a code academies for girls and then there were some women and we're close to saying that great but we got concerns about the kind of environment that they are entering into and what that they're gonna be in that hit those same issues you already commented on it but but you know it a lot of what we're doing at NIH is focus on data science and and really in on that and it's not new but there's still a feeling of like I think to me that's wide open but having read that are alternate listening to you now and like it's probably not wide open I just can't see all the ways that it's that it's closed door closing and forming into something that is excluding somebody even while it feels at this moment fairly wide opening and I would invite any insights you haven't but I'm certainly taking to heart your point about social justice I'm trying to think of ways to insert the conversation that doesn't leave me being the killed away in the room who is pointing out this isn't this is somehow shafting somebody you know it has that feeling of everyone can participate and they're selling various options to people and everyone can participate but I feel very aware from that article into it from students to committed it's not it must not it probably is dis moment forming structures that are exclusionary I just can't see them unfortunately that's true for pretty much all technical fields but and so somebody I think D nurse team and then our code mention for Western technoculture talked about how the technology industry is becoming kind of priesthood right and so they have their arcane beliefs but also their arcane practices which serve to identify who can and cannot commune with the sacred terminal and the things that you do to bond outside the sacred terminal right and I think in many ways that still holds true for a lot of STEM fields and many of those there it's really interesting I wrote a hard ago long a while back about a young lady named Adrian Richards and she was a mention of something called dongle gate I don't know I'm pretty sure y'all don't remember it cuz she was a developer conference she was a developer evangelist and two guys behind her during the conference started making jokes about dongles like those of you who Avenue or Mac laptops this is a dongle now you know men men can make sexual jokes out of anything so they started talking about I'll use my dongle and all other stuff and she reported them according to the code of conduct for the conference and the conference organisers sanctioned them they pulled the Minnesota they told him that that wasn't respectful behavior and asked him to leave she took the additional step of posting their picture on Twitter another time fifteen thousand followers and her followers a lot of whom are black women tech people and women tech people retweeted those though that picture and her comments and one of the guys ended up getting fired now she was subjected to rape threats death threats other sort of forms of violence boxing and the like because they said that she used her social media platform to shame those men for something that they didn't mean to do in their heart right and I bring this example of is and to show that even if you do everything you're supposed to do she was incredibly skilled she's been hired by a couple of different companies as a developer evangelist to bring other people into the fold to be as excited about Python and yet once she violated these masculine norms of being able to joke about sexual things that objectified women she was shamed she even lost her job because of this right and so that's the thing that I think the Codecademy people don't get you can have the technical virtuosity to do these things but once you're in you have to negotiate that world of toxic masculinity and really kind of arcane practices that reinforce their masculinity to show that they are masters of their domain I don't know if I have an answer but that brings to mind like there's just so many obstacles it almost I don't and I have so many examples do you remember the commercial of the talk that where young black woman gave the talk about interacting the lease to our child and how much that a lot of people really reacted strongly to a badly to it because they're like well you should never have to worry about the police being bad to you if you're not a bad person I think the same thing happens you have to give that talk to young women and minorities who are interested in going instead in some cases they already know like they already have experienced the discrimination the subtle microaggressions the less subtle macro aggressions in their class and you have to let them know this is going to be a constant throughout your time in this industry it's just something that you'll have to deal with on there will never be a point unless you go to say black data processors or meet the Black Caucus at a la right where you have a supportive community holding you down in many cases you'll be one of frank thing you'll have to learn to deal with these things so I don't have any words of hope for that but again this is racial realism like it's always going to be bad but there are ways that you can find to work around it submitted subvert it right and try to build a space for yourself to be happy and it makes you find it maybe it's also brained your conversation more and more into other people's spaces kind of influenced by the Library Association are one of our keynote speakers is going on period power and they're going to be releasing a period emoji that's awesome you know it's really much addressing it's natural it's part of life and why can't you be baby Tuesday okay one of the slick parts about modernity though is that it always finds new scientistic means to justify long-standing oppressions right not scientific right scientistic right so they'll find ways to use scientific principles and mean so the guy who came up with the DNA James Creek was a critter Watson Watson right and how he justified his research because he said he had a n a belief that black people were just not the equal genetically or intellectually about white people like that informed his Nobel prize-winning work and people were disappointed like how could he say those things he did this thing that was scientifically amazing in life there's two things they operate together on a regular basis our social media and seeking a boo-boo platform for everyone look at me I've been harm that hurts I need to be uplifted everyone join me people I hear your viewpoint I will offer the counter that in many ways when dealing with microaggressions you turn to a community of like-minded folk to help reassure you that what you saw or experienced doesn't make you crazy okay it just so happens that she had a large network all right but she ran into a larger network that was more heavily invested in protecting the fragility of whiteness particularly these white men that she worked with as then her own stature as a black woman developer of somewhere now right so it's not necessarily victimhood I mean I'm a mama's boy when something happened to me in school I ran to my mama says I don't like this had happened right and she we either say buckle up or go back out there or you know beat you myself but not in her own way she gave me support so Richards turned to her community it just so happened that Twitter as a broadcast platform also let people who were not part of our community participate in this particular thing so she did end up becoming a victim right she had a legitimate complaint her personal space and agency was violated in this thing it was dealt with at that moment but her sharing of that moment is somehow perceived as her asking to be celebrated as a victim and it wasn't that at all right in many ways the guys who ended up getting fired at sanctioned were rewarded with GoFundMe amounts in the tens of thousands right because they claim their victimhood because despite their violation they said it wasn't in their hearts right it was an individual act of perhaps a mistake and so they were rewarded for that slip and the subsequent expose of and Richards is still having trouble planning work okay so I pushed back a little bit on the idea that she was looking for victimhood I think this is a common narrative about social media that it's a space where people go to gain a claim for things that happen to them because they don't really have lives and that's not necessarily the case we all have spaces for the catharsis some of us do turn to social media because we found people that have distant bleep tied connections to us that will provide us compartment catharsis and support when we don't have them close by right being one up I was the first black faculty member in Iowa right for their lis Co I was a second male black male to graduate from Illinois library school at one hundred and some-odd years right so trust me there were no people around like me that I could bring this with our system Twitter in those cases helped me to be able to vent about the things that happens with me not because I want to be a victim but just cuz I want sometimes I do it you are not crazy this is and I think that's what I would like to sort everything crumbled this joke that's what I'm having I'm gonna saying I do have personally been destroyed to the point where you just have no very positive I'm not necessarily personally destroyed but if you think about the amount of harassment that women experience on an everyday basis all of the directors who were thought they were sitting right behind her in her ear shot knowing she was there to death I'm sorry no you're right many cases women don't feel comfortable making that complaint directly to the men who wants to say that that thing has to destroy them and then they eat the flatbread what if they hey look at me Empire so this is the bar wall push back again because her womanhood and her black womanhood definitely has something to do with this right if you can imagine coder conventions they are not filled with black people to it she could a turn she did turn towards the conference organizers who had an ethical code of conduct that that addressed the situation and dealt with it but she also had a need to have her concerns addressed within her home community and that's why she turned to Twitter and it does make a difference that she's a wanted you you missed that it could have been anybody but guys treat the objectification of women of homosexuals mentally ill people as part of their everyday banter without regarding the harm that it may cause to other people so are you saying that nobody should ever complain when people bring things that feel personally harmful to them to a wider audience they should just suck it up and keep it on the inside I would disagree with that questioning when people bring forth these kinds of things black thing that they didn't destroy but when they need to seek way to being in power in the situation of us she lost her job she got death threat she got rate threats so destroyed I think it's an actual let that little better but of course that's not the despicable and I'm not saying that it was not anything that looked like this would when she was totally the course of action she reported to the authorities handle this she needed a black woman for everyone to see around the world and that's what has happened as a result and thank you and I will have to disagree on this one but I appreciate your conversation [Applause]

Author Since: Mar 11, 2019

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